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SantaMonica

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SantaMonica last won the day on January 29 2017

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About SantaMonica

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    Butterfly Fish

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  • Country
    United States
  • Location
    Santa Monica, California, USA
  • Interests
    Aquariums, ponds

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  1. Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

    Iwarna was carrying several models; not sure if they still have them
  2. Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

    7-point screen is good; the holes are about 3mm diameter. But must be roughed up well.
  3. Moving aiptasia infested rock/coral to new tank

    Or just create an aipasia farm.
  4. Help for fragging of Zoas

    First be careful of the poison... use a facemask and gloves. Then just glue part of the rock and let those zoa's be buried.
  5. Anthias

    They do eat lots and lots of food particles in the water. Maybe some additional feeding will change the color.
  6. Yes this is one of the best thought that I've seen in a while, Triton or not.
  7. Those are such generic names, that you might have a better result by getting the scientific names and comparing those.
  8. Honey & milk dosing

    This is just food particle feeding. Small particles like the reef has. The more, the better. However there is a reason to think that using reef particles like pods, blended shrimp, etc, might be more accepted by the corals. Main point is to keep the particles in the water 24/7. And especially at night.
  9. White stuff on the surface of my tank

    Oils, from feeding. Same as the ocean. Means the corals are getting lots of food.
  10. Biobacteria recommendation

    Any reason for the hurry? Maybe they are client service tanks.
  11. Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

    Advanced Aquarist Feature Article for December 2013: Coral Feeding: An Overview http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2013/12/aafeature The picture in the article shows that in the 1000 litre test tank: 98% of the food particles go to the skimmer when there are 2 coral colonies 71% of the food particles go to the skimmer when there are 40 coral colonies 92% of the food particles go to the skimmer when there are 2 coral colonies, when skimming is cut in half 55% of the food particles go to the skimmer when there are 40 coral colonies, when skimming is cut in half "This trade-off between food availability and water quality can be circumvented by using plankton-saving filtration systems, which include [...] algal turf scrubbers" "Corals are able to feed on a wide range of particulate organic matter, which includes live organisms and their residues and excrements (detritus)." "...bacteria [...] can be a major source of nitrogen." [corals need nitrogen] "...when dry fish-feed or phytoplankton cultures are added to an aquarium, a part of this quickly ends up in the collection cup of the skimmer. "...mechanical filters (which can include biofilters and sand filters) result in a significant waste of food." "Detritus is a collective term for organic particles that arise from feces [waste], leftover food and decaying organisms. Detrital matter is common on coral reefs and in the aquarium, and slowly settles on the bottom as sediment. This sediment contains bacteria, protozoa, microscopic invertebrates, microalgae and organic material. These sedimentary sources can all serve as coral nutrients when suspended, especially for species growing in turbid waters. Experiments have revealed that many scleractinian corals can ingest and assimilate detritus which is trapped in coral mucus. Although stony corals may ingest detritus *when* it is available, several gorgonians have been found to *primarily* feed on suspended detritus." "Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important food source for many corals. [...] scleractinian corals take up dissolved glucose from the water. [algae produces glucose] More ecologically relevant, corals can also absorb amino acids and urea from the seawater" [algae produces aminos]
  12. Chaeto Reactors compared to Algae Scrubbers

    In statistics, "n" needs to be a sizable number, so that the other variations cancel out. This is why surveys are done on thousands of people, not five. The simple experiments I mention are just hobbyists, with n=1 for each person. But there have been many over the last ten years. I did not keep a list of them, sorry.
  13. Chaeto Reactors compared to Algae Scrubbers

    My understanding of "studies" is a scientific undertaking, which reduces noise and variables, so that the data of interest become valid. For just "simple" experiments, these are already plentiful across the web and forums.
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