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Harlequinmania

How to become a responsible Reefer ?

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The nature living coral reef system is home to thousands of species of marine life that use the corals irregular topography as an ideal place to shelter them .

Unfortunately, the popularity of the amazing coral reef has also created a negative impact on over harvesting and bad harvesting practices which damage the coral reef system. Pollution and excessive over fishing has also played a toll on this fragile reef ecosystem which is also the reason why we are seeing lesser corals and prices of corals go higher and higher.

This new thread started aim to share and discuss how we can help preserving the eco system being a responsible reefer,

so that we can help maintain this wonderfully hobby for the many many years to come ! :rolleyes:

Please share your thought here

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A solid first step would be to encourage the swapping of frags.

If we routinely organize frag swaps and meetings this will go a long way to easing the strain on the natural reefs.

I don't think the local market is evolved enough to be willing to pay extra for aquacultured frags like the US market is yet though,

so this should be our humble first step.

And as always do your research before you buy that piece of coral. Many if not most of us (myself included) are guilty of purchasing

a piece of livestock we had not researched thoroughly prior to purchase at least once before.

In my case it was a Flower Tree Coral, (Scleronephthya sp.) Fortunately it has not just survived, but is thriving in my 28G Nano,

I got lucky, but at the time I bought it I mis-identified it as the easier tree branch coral.

Also I believe that most reefers till this day still do not practice proper quarantine procedures when introducing new livestock to

their systems.

We need to realize that having a tank crashing due to neglect or oversight is not just a burden on our own wallets, but

that it also takes a toll on the natural reef ecosystem in the depleted livestock that we have just squandered and will be looking to replace again.

The best advice I can think to give new reefers is to "Do it right, not do it cheap"

You don't need to spend exorbitant amounts on money on boutique brands, but don't expect to get by with an airstone, and an annual water change.

I consider having a chiller running and a 20% monthly water change to be among the barest minimum requirements to responsibly maintain a reef tank.

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Besides being aware on an individual level, the community as a whole should be proactive in raising awareness and educating newbies on responsible practices.

Very often, new members will tend to be a bit more impatient and make costly mistakes that result in loss of lifestock, or there are reefers who openly talk about doing things like harvesting corals, live rocks or sand from local beaches. This usually makes me wonder, for every person who does things like that and posts it online, how many more out there are making the same mistakes.

If we stand together as a community and frown upon such things instead of keeping quiet and minding our own business (or tank :P), and correct and educate the new members on a public forum like this, hopefully it will discourage similar irresponsible acts in future.

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Do not reef... that is responsible earthling should do... :P

Yup, on top of being vegan, living in a self sufficient plot of land up in the mountains. And whatever you do, don't fart. Please hold it in — a single person contributes up to 1.5L of methane a day, which causes global warming.

Realistically though, we just do what is within our means. Every action, no matter how small, helps. If this is the hobby we have adopted, then do it responsibly to minimise the impact on the environment :)

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A solid first step would be to encourage the swapping of frags.

If we routinely organize frag swaps and meetings this will go a long way to easing the strain on the natural reefs.

I don't think the local market is evolved enough to be willing to pay extra for aquacultured frags like the US market is yet though,

so this should be our humble first step.

And as always do your research before you buy that piece of coral. Many if not most of us (myself included) are guilty of purchasing

a piece of livestock we had not researched thoroughly prior to purchase at least once before.

In my case it was a Flower Tree Coral, (Scleronephthya sp.) Fortunately it has not just survived, but is thriving in my 28G Nano,

I got lucky, but at the time I bought it I mis-identified it as the easier tree branch coral.

Also I believe that most reefers till this day still do not practice proper quarantine procedures when introducing new livestock to

their systems.

We need to realize that having a tank crashing due to neglect or oversight is not just a burden on our own wallets, but

that it also takes a toll on the natural reef ecosystem in the depleted livestock that we have just squandered and will be looking to replace again.

The best advice I can think to give new reefers is to "Do it right, not do it cheap"

You don't need to spend exorbitant amounts on money on boutique brands, but don't expect to get by with an airstone, and an annual water change.

I consider having a chiller running and a 20% monthly water change to be among the barest minimum requirements to responsibly maintain a reef tank.

I do remember as well many years ago when i am also still a newbie that i bought some corals and not knowing enough how to take care of it and result it being death. :paiseh: ( i started to wonder now how many newbie like me (long time ago) that has resulted in the death of the precious corals from the sea ? ) How i wish i have found this forum much eariler before i started my first marine to get all the information i need. :upsidedown:

Having the right and proper knowledge in this hobby is the key for sucessful reef keeping, and all the years of the information and guiding contribution from the senior reefer found in this forum will hopefully help reduce the number of fish and corals losses for new comer in this hobby.

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I do remember as well many years ago when i am also still a newbie that i bought some corals and not knowing enough how to take care of it and result it being death. :paiseh: ( i started to wonder now how many newbie like me (long time ago) that has resulted in the death of the precious corals from the sea ? ) How i wish i have found this forum much eariler before i started my first marine to get all the information i need. :upsidedown:

Having the right and proper knowledge in this hobby is the key for sucessful reef keeping, and all the years of the information and proper guiding that can be found in this forum will hopefully help reduce the number of fish and corals losses for new comer in this hobby.

totally agree with you.. i am also guilty of that as well...

good thing is those new to reefing would be able to get sound advices from all the old birds around.. advice like 'dont use a damsel for cycling!' or 'dun think that fellow is reef safe'... this i believe allow the newbies to make better choices when purchasing LS..

also.. dun get "forced" to buy LS just becos gf/wife/kids says:"this one so cute... i like... buy leh..." hahaha...

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totally agree with you.. i am also guilty of that as well...

good thing is those new to reefing would be able to get sound advices from all the old birds around.. advice like 'dont use a damsel for cycling!' or 'dun think that fellow is reef safe'... this i believe allow the newbies to make better choices when purchasing LS..

also.. dun get "forced" to buy LS just becos gf/wife/kids says:"this one so cute... i like... buy leh..." hahaha...

Yes, you are right.. Especially it is so tempting with some many colorful Marine fish and corals around when you visit the LFS , and you cant resist to get everything at one go and put in itself your tank. The next thing you know.. Your corals is not doing well or your fish is being bully/ stress ect..

Patient is the Key .

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Reefing is a hobby that we adopt and make sense that we try to be responsible reefers. The whole tank's inhabitants are at our mercy, any wrong mistakes we made may mark the end of their lives. l was guilty too when l first started reefing. What l like about this forum is that is is full of important information and real-life experiences shared by fellow reefers. People are always willing to share a bit of their knowledge to new reefers and help them be a better reefer..saving money and precious lives of marine creatures.

Though l don't really keep corals, so far l think corals fragging and exchanges (SPS and zoas that l see in this forum) and home breeding of livestocks are one of the best ways to help conservation.

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Kudos to admin for creating this thread. This issue is very much in-line with Green and Eco themes.

Here's a must read for all responsible aquarists. From Ocean to Aquarium: the global trade in marine ornamental species

http://www.unep-wcmc.org/resources/publica...o_series/17.htm

It shows how precious a lowly damsel really is. This report is not new but hardly anyone knows about it.

In this report: For each 2 Banggai cardinal that makes it to the LFS, 8 others had died.

I vote for: Frag swaps, frag trades, regular educational talks, don't buy important and sensitive species (example: cleaner wrasse, Moorish Idols)

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Kudos to admin for creating this thread. This issue is very much in-line with Green and Eco themes.

Here's a must read for all responsible aquarists. From Ocean to Aquarium: the global trade in marine ornamental species

http://www.unep-wcmc.org/resources/publica...o_series/17.htm

It shows how precious a lowly damsel really is. This report is not new but hardly anyone knows about it.

In this report: For each 2 Banggai cardinal that makes it to the LFS, 8 others had died.

I vote for: Frag swaps, frag trades, regular educational talks, don't buy important and sensitive species (example: cleaner wrasse, Moorish Idols)

Wow.. Great article you share here.. I am like you whom have stopped buying cleaner wrasse for a long long time, since it will not last in your tank no matter how good your water condition is. It is better that they are left out in their own world.

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