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OMG! Look at these hybrids and rare fishes!


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Courtesy of BlueHarbor

My Juvenile hippo tang.

Fishbase has been updated with pictures of C. claire. http://www.fishbase.us/photos/thumbnailssummary.php?ID=59481

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This fish is being kept by a Tai Wan Aquarist(Stanley Shen).

The picture is sent from him.

The way of keeping a large group of angel fish in a bare bottom tank is not accept by majority US reefer nowaday.

We can't denied that it is a traditional popular way of fish keeping in Hong Kong and Tai Wan.

No matter what this is really a rare beautiful fish.

Any expert can explain why Emperor angel is not likely to hybridize with other species?

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Any expert can explain why Emperor angel is not likely to hybridize with other species?

Some fishes are just not as promiscuous as other fishes. They rarely hybridize with other fish, emperor angel being one of them.

Another example is how common queen x blue angel to produce townsendi. However found in the same area the rock beauty on the other hand does not hybridize as readily with queen. We have so far only heard and seen one rock beauty hybrid.

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Three amazing deepwater fishes photographed in Cebu, Mactan Island.

Deepwater Chromis Brevirostris

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Deepwater Tryssogobius Sp

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Deepwater Pseudochromis Sp. (50m and deeper)

attachicon.gifdottyback sp.jpg

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Great to see these photos. This is Pseudoplesiops collare, a species I described over 20 years ago with Jack Randall and Alasdair Edwards. (It was actually the first fish species I ever named.) This species is very rare in museum collections ... I am aware of only four specimens. I'd be very interested to hear more details on where they were photographed, etc., as I am currently working up a major paper revising the genus Pseudoplesiops. Thanks, Tony

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Great to see these photos. This is Pseudoplesiops collare, a species I described over 20 years ago with Jack Randall and Alasdair Edwards. (It was actually the first fish species I ever named.) This species is very rare in museum collections ... I am aware of only four specimens. I'd be very interested to hear more details on where they were photographed, etc., as I am currently working up a major paper revising the genus Pseudoplesiops. Thanks, Tony
It's a pleasure and honor to have you here dr gill
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Yuri, Digi, and anyone else.

i have recently been sent a picture of an unknown dottyback for ID. it has however, an unsual tail. it is slightly rhomboidal in shape. the only dottyback i know with a diamond tail is Ogilbyna verlifera, the sailfin dottyback. however there are very few images of it online and it is found in australia. the males have very long diamond tails like lanceolatus fairy wrasse.

this dottyback is found in cebu, philippines.

i suspected it was afterall, O. verlifera, but a female. with an under devleoped tail and subdued coloration.

here is a video from shutterstock with an identical fish swimming in this time, indonesia. it is labelled as O. velifera female. is this accurate, i don't know. i have e-mailed dottyback authority Dr. Anthony Gill and hopefully we'll get a reply. video here -> http://footage.shutterstock.com/clip-2534186-stock-footage-female-adult-sailfin-dottyback-ogilbyina-velifera-swimming-underwater-in-indonesia.html

so what do you think?

The fish in the photo appears to be a new species closely related to Pseudochromis reticulatus (from north-western Australia), P. pictus (SE Indonesia) and P. jace (NE Indonesia (West Papua)). I am currently working on another new species in the group (which is characterised by, among other things, the unusual caudal-fin shape) from NE Indonesia. I have some juvenile specimens from Cebu that may be the same as species in the photo here, but it would be good to have larger specimens for study. The pseudochromid in the footage from Indonesia is P. pictus.

Thanks, Tony

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IMG00813-20120404-1428.jpg

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This is what dottyback? id pls.... is it rare??

This is a species of Lubbockichthys, possibly one of the new ones I'm working on from Cebu. Lubbockichthys species are difficult to tell apart ... I have been working on the genus for a couple of decades and still need x-rays to identify some of the species! There is a lot of confusion at the moment about these species, as several are often identified as Pseudoplesiops rosae. This error appears to have originated from a couple of guide books published by Rudie Kuiter, but has been perpetuated in the aquarium hobby. Real P. rosae is a very different fish: very small (around 3 cm) with large scales. There are photos of it here: http://research.kahaku.go.jp/zoology/Fishes_of_Andaman_Sea/contents/pseudochromidae/03.htmlhttp://research.kahaku.go.jp/zoology/Fishes_of_Andaman_Sea/contents/pseudochromidae/03.html The coloration can be very variable, ranging from green or brown to bright yellow or bright red. The dark marking behind in the eye is usually present, but is sometimes difficult to see.

Thanks,

Tony

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Don't know if this was shared before!

Wow a big tank with a lot of fishes!

Some very difficult to keep species like venustus and lennardi. I even see a terelabrus sp. from maldive if i am not wrong.

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Great to see these photos. This is Pseudoplesiops collare, a species I described over 20 years ago with Jack Randall and Alasdair Edwards. (It was actually the first fish species I ever named.) This species is very rare in museum collections ... I am aware of only four specimens. I'd be very interested to hear more details on where they were photographed, etc., as I am currently working up a major paper revising the genus Pseudoplesiops. Thanks, Tony

Hi Dr Gill,

It's awesome to have you here! An expert on board to clear our doubts and myths in dottybacks!

This collare pic that i attached from fishbase looks quite different from those i posted. In Jack Randall picture below it is more brownish and lack a yellow tail.

post-10328-0-73485900-1391818558_thumb.j

Whereas in this pic i below i posted earlier, the fish appears more pinkish and has a translucent yellow tail.

post-10328-0-09914300-1391818684.jpg

Since you said both are the same species, which is collare, does collare has two color forms? One brown one pink?

Or is it just the photo quality that caused the color difference?

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This is a species of Lubbockichthys, possibly one of the new ones I'm working on from Cebu. Lubbockichthys species are difficult to tell apart ... I have been working on the genus for a couple of decades and still need x-rays to identify some of the species! There is a lot of confusion at the moment about these species, as several are often identified as Pseudoplesiops rosae. This error appears to have originated from a couple of guide books published by Rudie Kuiter, but has been perpetuated in the aquarium hobby. Real P. rosae is a very different fish: very small (around 3 cm) with large scales. There are photos of it here: http://research.kahaku.go.jp/zoology/Fishes_of_Andaman_Sea/contents/pseudochromidae/03.htmlhttp://research.kahaku.go.jp/zoology/Fishes_of_Andaman_Sea/contents/pseudochromidae/03.html The coloration can be very variable, ranging from green or brown to bright yellow or bright red. The dark marking behind in the eye is usually present, but is sometimes difficult to see.

Thanks,

Tony

Is this fish Lubbockichthys Multisquamatus?

post-10328-0-25963000-1391818924.jpg

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It actually looks more like poweri compare to meleagris.. The body shape and color leans more towards poweri unless this is a very small specimen.

The website updated it as southern blue. And southern blue is meleagris.

I can't really tell the difference btween poweri and meleagris.

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